The early childhood development theories in psychology

A Brief History Psychologists and other theorists have proposed a number of different theories centered on how children develop. Some of these theories are known as grand theories and attempt to explain almost every aspect of how people change and grow over the course of childhood.

The early childhood development theories in psychology

A Brief History Psychologists and other theorists have proposed a number of different theories centered on how children develop. Some of these theories are known as grand theories and attempt to explain almost every aspect of how people change and grow over the course of childhood.

In other instances, these theories focus on a more narrow aspect of development. Some of the greatest minds in the history of psychology contributed a few of the best-known developmental theories.

Throughout psychology history, a number of different child development theories have emerged to explain the changes that take place during the early part of life. In the modern study of child development, we simply take for granted the fact that children are fundamentally different than adults.

Yet for much of human history, kids were simply seen as smaller versions of their adult counterparts. It has only been relatively recently that the field of developmental psychology has helped us understand the way children think is very different from how adults think.

Thanks to the work of some pioneering psychologists and other researchers, we now have a much deeper and richer understanding of how kids grow. Psychoanalytic Child Development Theories The psychoanalytic theories of child development tend to focus on things such as the unconscious, and forming the ego.

If a child does not successfully complete a stage, Freud suggested that he or she would develop a fixation that would later influence adult personality and behavior. How Each Style Impacts Children Freud believed that children progress through a series of psychosexual stages.

During each stage, the pleasure seeking energies of the id drive for satisfaction based on a particular erogenous zone. During the oral stage, for example, a child derives pleasure from activities that involve the mouth such as sucking or chewing.

Conflicts associated with stage must be successfully resolved in order to develop a healthy adult personality.

The early childhood development theories in psychology

Failing to resolve these conflicts can result in a fixation at a particular point in development. Freud believed that development was largely complete by age 5, while Erikson believed that people continue to develop and grow well into old age.

At each stage of development, people face a crisis that they must master. Mastering the crisis leads to the development of a psychological virtue. For example, the primary conflict during the adolescent period involves establishing a sense of personal identity. Success or failure in dealing with the conflicts at each stage can impact overall functioning.

During the adolescent stage, for example, failure to develop an identity results in role confusion. During this early stage of life, it is important for children to receive consistent care so that they can learn to trust the people in the world around them.

Development continues as children grow, and at each stage the face new conflicts and learn new skills that serve them well throughout life.

Behavioral Child Development Theories Behavioral child development theories center on how children learn through their interactions with the environment. Early in the twentieth century, the school of thought known as behaviorism took hold in psychology. The behaviorist believed that learning and development were the result of associations, rewards, and punishments.

An Overview Two important behavioral processes that influence development are classical conditioning and operant conditioning. Classical conditioning involves forming an association between a previously neutral stimulus and a stimulus that naturally and automatically produces a response.

After an association has been formed, the once neutral stimulus now produces the response all in its own. Operant conditioning involves learning as a result of reinforcement or punishment.

The consequences of a behavior determine how likely it is for that behavior to occur again in the future. When a behavior is reinforced, or strengthened, then it is more likely that the behavior will occur again in the future.

When a behavior is punished, or weakened, then it is less likely to occur again in the future.Behavioral theories of child development focus on how environmental interaction influences behavior and are based on the theories of theorists such as John B.

Watson, Ivan Pavlov, and B. F. Skinner. These theories deal only with observable behaviors. A significant proportion of theories within this discipline focus upon development during childhood, as this is the period during an individual's lifespan when the most change occurs.

Developmental psychologists study a wide range of theoretical areas, such as biological, social, emotion, and cognitive heartoftexashop.com: Saul Mcleod.

Child Development Theories has different methods. They focus on the development theory on children's stages of growth. David Whitebread is Senior Lecturer in Developmental Psychology and Early Years Education in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge.

Development in Infancy and Childhood

David Whitebread will be discussing key ideas from Developmental Psychology and Early Childhood Education in the SAGE Early Years Masterclass, a free professional development experience .

David Whitebread is Senior Lecturer in Developmental Psychology and Early Years Education in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. David Whitebread will be discussing key ideas from Developmental Psychology and Early Childhood Education in the SAGE Early Years Masterclass, a free professional development experience hosted by Kathy Brodie.

Although Piaget's theories are subject to some criticism, they are widely used and important in guiding research in childhood cognitive development. Language development.

Language acquisition is one of the most important aspects of a child's development.

Developmental Psychology | Simply Psychology